06 Dec

RV Family Travel Atlas: Acadia National Park Adventure Guide

On this week’s episode of RV Family Travel Atlas, we are heading to Acadia National Park, one of our favorite summer destinations. We will give you recommendations for where to stay and what to eat. We will also tell you about the best family-friendly hikes and activities on Mount Desert Island.

Join us as we explore popular tourist attractions and also take you to the quieter side of Acadia, where we have escaped the summer crowds and found lots of local treasures.

Click on the links above to read our articles on the Jayco Journal about all of these Acadia National Park recommendations.

We have another great giveaway this week: Discover Acadia National Park, by the Appalachian Mountain Club. We used this book a ton when planning our trips, and all of the hikes that we talk about are detailed in this book. Enter to win here.

And make sure you listen to this week’s episode to find out about our ‘podcast only’ giveaway this week…

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03 Nov

10 Reasons Why RV Vacations Are Better!

You can also listen to our RV Family Travel Atlas podcast: 10 Reasons RV Vacations are Better

A few years ago, a great hotel deal tempted us into booking a weekend getaway with the boys. We had never stayed in a hotel with them, and we were quite worried that everything, including sippy cups and blankies, would hit the fan.

Well, it did. Two nights in a hotel room with our two year olds had us running back to kiss the road our RV traveled on. After yelling don’t touch that three million times and locking ourselves in the bathroom to eat snacks and watch a movie on the laptop after bedtime, we were pining for the camper, the campground, and the campfire.

We have stayed in a few hotels since then, and we always leave grateful that our main form of travel is an RV. Here are our top 10 reasons why we choose RV vacations over any other type of travel.

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The RVIA (Recreational Vehicle Industry Association) reports that RV vacations are 23-59% less expensive for families owning RVs. We have found that we save over 50% on most trips by traveling in our camper. This savings allows us to spend up to 40 nights a year on the road, something we could never do if we were staying in hotels.

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Do you remember all those friends you met while staying in hotels? Yeah, neither do we. But we meet and talk to people from all over the world when we are staying at campgrounds. Over the last year we have met lovely folks from Canada, Wales, California, and Germany. We have been given impromptu floor plan tours by more campground neighbors than we can count.

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When you rent a campsite, you also get room for your kids to roam. We can sit and relax while our boys play soccer or ride their bikes right in front of our site. This sure beats chasing them down a hotel hallway or yelling at them as they press every button in the elevator and set off emergency alarms. Not that we would know about that!

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You don’t have to leave to find activities. They are right there at the campground. Some hotels have pools, but most campgrounds also have playgrounds, volleyball courts, fishing holes, mini-golf courses, crafts, and outdoor movie nights. The campground is not just a place to stay…it can become one of the most memorable parts of your vacation.

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We have set up mini bars in hotel bathrooms and watched a movie on a laptop with shared earphones while the boys slept. Completely pathetic. At a campground, you put the kids to bed and then hangout around the campfire with food, friends, drinks, and music. What’s the contest?

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RV vacations make it very easy to travel with family and friends. Our travel trailer sleeps eight comfortably, so we love it when guests come on trips with us. Buddy sites allow two families to camp side-by-side, creating a common area in the middle for meals and playtime. Both families have their own private space and plenty of room to socialize.

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Most campgrounds are dog friendly, and many RVers travel with their four-legged family members. Many places have dog runs and pet playgrounds. There is also, of course, plenty of space for your morning and evening walks.

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This saves you money and helps everyone eat healthier. We spend about the same amount of money on groceries whether at home or on the road, and we know our kids are getting a balanced diet—very tricky to accomplish while eating out three meals a day.

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Yeah, someone else didn’t sleep in your bed the night before. And the night before that. ‘Nuff said.

10reconnectnature

Campgrounds encourage us to truly enjoy the great outdoors. From morning walks, to picnic table meals, to hide and seek under the stars, an RV vacation brings us closer to nature and closer together. There are tons of studies that point to the rejuvenating effects of time spent outside. Our three happy kids are proof enough for us.

29 Sep

Fantastic Family Activities Near Acadia National Park

We were perfectly happy to do nothing besides hike, bike, and eat lobster when we traveled to Acadia National Park before having children. But when we returned with kids, we branched out and explored a variety of other activities offered in the Bar Harbor area. Good choice on our part. There are so many great affordable family friendly activities that really celebrate the local culture of Maine. All of the following recommendations were tons of fun for the kids and very educational for the adults. Win / Win!

Timber Tina’s Great Maine Lumberjack Show

Timber Tina's Great Maine Lumberjack Show

Let’s be honest…the boys had no idea what a lumberjack was before we went to this show. As we sat in the bleachers, they eyed the chainsaws and axes with more than a little suspicion. Then the show started and they were in awe from beginning to end. Timber Tina, a former contestant on Survivor, mixes interesting lumberjack history with good ole team competition.

The boys cheered loudly for the green team, and were pretty darn excited when they won. Timber Tina brings up all the kids and gives them a lesson in cross-cut sawing, then sends them home with a certificate signed by a real life lumberjack. Ask Max and Theo about this show and you will get quite an earful. You might also get a chopping demonstration performed with their souvenir axes.

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The Mount Desert Oceanarium


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This wonderful local gem, operated for four decades by Audrey and David Mills, is a fascinating hybrid of a museum, aquarium, and preserve. Your basic tour package includes three different interactive presentations: the touch tank, the lobster museum, and the lobster hatchery. You can also upgrade your ticket and take a guided tour through the salt marches on the premises. The touch tank presentation allowed the kids to handle sea stars, sea cucumbers, and horse shoe crabs.

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During the lobster museum demonstration, Max actually got to band the claws of a lobster and place it in a trap on the boat. Pretty exciting stuff for a five year old! The oceanarium immerses visitors in the lobster culture of coastal Maine with hands on activities presented by a friendly, knowledgable staff. The playground outside the gift shop? That’s just a bonus.

Dive-In Theater with Diver Ed

Dive-In Theater with Diver Ed
There are many boat tour options near Acadia National Park, but if you’re traveling with kids, there is only one show in town. Join Diver Ed on the Starfish Enterprise for a two hour tour of Frenchman Bay that will surprise and delight the whole family. As the passengers sit comfortably on deck, Diver Ed will suit up in his scuba gear, then ask the kids to push him into the ocean so that he can search for lobsters, sea cucumbers, sea stars, and sea urchins. While Diver Ed collects these sea creatures you get to watch him and hear him on the ships’ big screen. But the best part is this—when he returns to the boat he brings all of his discoveries with him and places them in touch tanks for the kids to enjoy. While the sea creatures are colorful and amazing, the true star of the show is Diver Ed. His larger than life personality and kid-friendly humor will make this one of your all-time favorite family travel memories.

Ranger Park Programs, Acadia National Park

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When you purchase your pass to Acadia National Park you will also receive a schedule of Ranger Programs. We strongly recommend that you take a good look at this schedule and pick at least one to attend. Most of them are free, and many of them are appropriate for families with children. We chose to attend a program called Animal Tales that introduced the boys to some of Acadia’s “fuzzy, furry, and funny creatures through stories and activities.” The ranger who led this activity used puppets and silly songs to teach the kids about moose, loons, peregrine falcons, and other native species. She was also energetic and engaging. Her moose imitation was so realistic that it made Stephanie feel a bit better about not actually seeing one on our trip.
Acadia National Park, Bar Harbor, and the rest of Mount Desert Island form a premiere location for a family vacation. There are excellent campgrounds, delicious options for seafood, exciting and affordable family activities, and one of our country’s most beautiful National Parks. if your family is looking for its next great adventure, then Acadia may just be the perfect place. It was for us.

11 Sep

Great Food without the Crowds: Eating and the Quiet Side of Acadia

This summer Good Morning America named Acadia National Park “America’s Favorite Place” and people from everywhere flocked to see what the fuss was all about. We found the park much more crowded compared to our previous visits, and this led us to explore some of the quieter places on the island.

If you are visiting for the first time, places like Jordan Pond House in the National Park and The Lompoc Cafe in Bar Harbor are not to be missed.

But don’t get stuck waiting in line at the crowded downtown tourist joints. Just a short drive away from Bar Harbor and the Park Loop is a world of bakeries, restaurants, cafes, and lobster shacks that will let you taste the best of Maine without the crowds. Here are some of our favorite food discoveries from the quieter side.

TheDocksider

The Docksider is a lobster pound in Northeast Harbor with an emphasize on locally sourced, organic food. Yes, the lobster and the chowder are delicious. But this quirky and unique restaurant has more to offer than the standard seafood fare. Max had been craving meatballs and we found them here. The really surprising part? They were downright delicious. If you can’t get a table, order the food to go and take it down to the harbor where you can easily find an empty picnic table with a water view.

Little Notch Bakery

Little Notch Bakery in Southwest Harbor, with a second location in Bar Harbor, has delicious pastry, bread, and pizza. We went in for a mid-afternoon snack, but ended up sampling quite a few of the treats. Then we picked out a few loaves of bread for the rest of our trip. The staff was kind and helpful, offering hospitable smiles even after one of the boys spilled an entire smoothie on a chair cushion.

The Common Good Cafe

Our favorite discovery of the whole trip was The Common Good Cafe, which serves up popovers, oatmeal, coffee, and juice 7 days a week at no charge (donations are welcomed). This local non-profit raises money to help feed struggling folks through the hard winters in Maine. Live music by local musicians, such as the 14-piece ukelele band that mesmerized us, and a wonderful space filled with toys for the little guys made this one of the most magical experiences of our trip.

Thurston's

Thurston’s is a famous lobster pound that is off the beaten path in the small town of Bernard. Jeremy voted this the best lobster roll of our trip. The crab cakes were truly perfect…lots of crab, lots of flavor, not a lot of anything else. We have been here in previous years for dinner and it was quite crowded. At lunchtime, however, we had the entire screened-in dock to ourselves.

Mother'sKitchen

We ate lunch at Mother’s Kitchen on our last day in Acadia. If we had discovered it earlier, we probably would have been regulars during our stay. Just down the road from the Bar Harbor/Oceanside KOA, Mother’s Kitchen served classic and homey sandwiches with a twist. The Grand Banker, Lightning Strikes, and Grandpa Jack are just a few names of sandwiches made from fresh, delicious ingredients and served on crusty, perfect bread. End your meal with a cup of Crooked Porch Coffee and you should be charged up for the next hike. Hours are 10-2 pm, Monday-Friday…just as quirky as the sandwiches.

College of the Atlantic, Dining Hall

This may sound like a joke, but the best and most affordable lunch on Mount Desert Island can be found at the College of the Atlantic’s Blair Dining Hall, nicknamed “Take-a-Break” by students. All food is organic, with an emphasis on local and sustainable ingredients. Baked goods are made from scratch daily. The focus on world cuisines mean that the menu is varied and creative. After lunch, visit the admissions office and buy a t-shirt or sweatshirt for the perfect, unique souvenir. On our last trip, we showed up and found out that the cafe was closed for the week. We almost cried. But we still bought shirts.

If this trip reinforced anything we have learned from traveling, it was the importance of asking locals and other campers for recommendations. Even though this was not our first visit to Acadia National Park, we felt like we were discovering it all over again. We hope you also wander away from Bar Harbor and the Park Loop to explore the quieter side of Acadia. If you do, please let us know what you find.

09 Sep

Hiking Acadia with Kids: 5 Amazing Hikes for the Whole Family

This article originally appeared in the Jayco Journal.

With over 120 miles of hiking trails on Mount Desert Island, you could visit Acadia National Park many times over and never walk the same path twice. After three visits to Acadia (two of them with young kids in tow) we have discovered some amazing family-friendly hikes that will please both children and adults. All of these hikes encompass the best that Acadia has to offer, with sweeping ocean views, dramatic granite cliffs, and landscapes filled with cedar, birch, and spruce. 

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This easy four-mile round trip hike (also known as Ocean Path or Ocean Drive Trail) is the classic introductory hike to Acadia. Starting off at Sand Beach, the path brings you to Thunder Hole and Otter Cliffs, passing by one beautiful vista after another. There are many small turnoffs that can lead to dramatic views, and also dramatic drop offs. If you wander off the main trail, keep a close eye on your kids. There are also stretches where the path is right next to the road. Traffic can be fast and close, so hand-holding might be in order. Even though we enjoyed the scenery, this hike was crowded and usually is during the peak visiting season.

Reward yourselves after the hike with a swim at Sand Beach…just be prepared to squeal as you dive into the cold water.

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One of the more famous family-friendly hikes within the Park Loop, this trail also rewards its hikers with stunning views of Sand Beach, Otter Cliffs, and Cadillac Mountain. We enjoyed this trail with another family and all of the kids had a blast navigating the rocky terrain.  The summit offered incredible ocean panoramas as well as a safe space for snacking and enjoying the view. If you are feeling more adventurous, take the Cadillac Cliffs trail spur. We avoided this on account of young Wesley.

One local mom we met on the trail recommended parking at the Gorham Mountain Trail head, hiking to Sand Beach, and taking the Island Explorer Bus back to your car at the trail head. The promise of a fun bus ride back to the car might do wonders to motivate little hikers.

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If you want to get away from the crowds clustered around the Park Loop, drive past Southwest Harbor to the Wonderland and Ship Harbor Trails. Both of these trails can be done independently, or you can do what we did: hike out to the water on the Wonderland Trail, then head west along the rocky beach to the Ship Harbor Trail and complete a loop back to the parking lot.

Time for just one of these two trails? We think Ship Harbor is your best bet, offering lots of paths down to the tide pools and, of course, great water views. We hiked these trails on a weekend during peak season and saw only a handful of people. This is truly the quieter side of Acadia.

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We get much of our travel intel from the recommendations of other campers. A friendly hiking dad named Chris told us that the Flying Mountain Trail would be perfect for our family. He was right. This 1.5 mile loop was great fun for the boys, giving them a good challenge at the beginning with a steep ascent ending with beautiful views of the Somes Sound. The tricky descent kept them entertained, and there is a rock beach where the kids can play at the bottom. The hike ends with an easy walk via a fire road right back to the parking lot.  Awesome hike.  Thanks, Chris.

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We’ve written about the Great Head Trail before on this blog.  This was the first hike we took with the twins on our first long camping road trip years ago, so it holds a special place in our hearts.  In our opinion, it has just the right amount of challenge and offers the perfect Acadian panoramic views. There is also the added bonus of ending the hike on Sand Beach where the kids can splash and play (if they have any energy leftover).

If you have a favorite hike in Acadia National Park, kid-friendly or not, let us know in the comments below. We plan on going back when the boys are older and tackling some greater challenges!

We used the following 3 books to plan our hiking in Acadia. We strongly recommend them.

Tom St. Germain’s A Walk in the Park is the best-selling trail guide for Acadia National Park for good reason. It fits in the back of your pocket and includes maps and concise descriptions of over fifty hikes.

The AMC’s Discover Acadia National Park by Jerry and Marcy Monkman also describes the park’s best biking and paddling. It includes a pull-out discovery map, far more detailed than the free one available at the visitor center.

We also recommend Best Hikes with Kids: Vermont, New Hampshire, & Maine, published by The Mountaineers Books. We have used this book in all three states, so keep a copy in your camper when traveling in New England! 

 

07 Sep

A Perfect Day in Belfast, Maine: Exploring the MidCoast of Vacationland

This post originally appeared on The Jayco Journal. On our last trip to the MidCoast region of Maine, we explored Camden, Rockland, Lincolnville, and Boothbay. This time we ventured a bit farther north to Belfast. Boy, are we glad we did…

Over the last four years, we have had many wonderful days of camping, and a handful of perfect ones.  Our first full day of vacation in Belfast, Maine was stunning from beginning to end.  A perfect summer day if we’ve ever had one.

So here is our set of instructions for enjoying your own amazing day in Belfast, Maine.

1. Wake up early at the oceanfront Moorings RV Resort, drink in the view, and do your morning stretches.

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2. Head down to the rocky beach and do some exploring.

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3. Launch your kayak from the beach and enjoy the quiet, picturesque scenery of the Penobscot Bay. If you give your kids the camera, this will keep them entertained spotting loons, lobster traps, sailboats, and fish. Some of their pictures might even be pretty cool. Can you figure out which photo Theo took?

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4. Clean up and head into town to check out the beautiful playground at Belfast City Park.  With water views and a design that ties into the landscape, this place will be appreciated by the whole family. Chat with the very friendly local parents and you will know exactly what to do with the rest of your stay in Belfast.

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5. Eat lunch at the Belfast Co-op Cafe to experience great food and local culture. The soups, sandwiches, and quesadillas were phenomenal. With everything from pizza to hotdogs to vegan burritos, there is something on the menu for everyone.

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6. Walk off lunch by strolling along the Harbor Walk. This path takes you through working shipyards and across the bay on a wonderful footbridge.

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7. Shop Downtown Belfast where you can visit an olive oil tasting room, a gourmet cheese shop, the oldest shoe store in the country, or one of the well-curated book stores.

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8. Return to the campground, where just a short stroll up the hill will land you at one of the best restaurants in this area. Papa J’s has all of the standard fare you might be looking for on your trip to the Maine Coast—whole lobster, lobster rolls, and a long list of seafood options. However, this place also offers so much more. The steaks are perfectly seasoned and cooked, and we could eat the scallops appetizer every day for the rest of our lives. Our waitress told us that the lobster pizza is a runaway favorite. We will have to return to try it. An added bonus is that all campers get a 5% discount. Thank you very much.

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9. Take an evening walk on the beach and watch the moon rise over the bay.

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10. Pile on the layers for stories around the campfire. S’mores will work just fine, too.

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18 Jun

How to Camp Happy: Lessons from Four Years of RVing

This article originally appeared in the Jayco Journal.

Isn’t it great when you can look back and laugh at an epic camping fail?

We have all had those trips that did not go exactly as planned, and ours was four years ago on a chilly weekend at Camp Taylor in the Skylands Region of New Jersey. Our family was still new to RVing, and we had only been on three trips with our pop up camper.

Let’s just say our lack of experience was embarrassingly obvious that weekend. From running out of propane in the middle of a 35-degree night, to an epic toddlers’ meltdown during a wolf preserve tour, we had our fair share of ‘moments.’

This past week we returned, and the experience was everything a great camping trip should be, full of playing, hiking, fishing, and lots of great eating.

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So what changed? Mostly us. After spending over 100 nights in our RV, we have learned a few things. Here are the three most important lessons we can share from the past four years…

1. The campsite is everything, so do your homework. 

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It took us a while to realize that no matter how nice the campground is, your personal site must suit your needs as a family. A waterfront site sounds amazing right? Well, it turns into a stressful experience if you have twin two year olds trying to take a swim in the creek every moment of the day.

Our first site at Camp Taylor four years ago was surrounded by a beautiful, rocky landscape. Guess what? Toddlers love two things: climbing on rocks and throwing rocks, so we spent much of the weekend kissing boo boos and telling them no, no, no. Not ideal.

Now we take the time to talk to campground owners about our needs as a family. We are very specific about what we want—close proximity to the playground, little to no through traffic, and a bit of distance from neighbors who may be bothered by our children’s noisy antics. It may take a long phone call and a bit of persistence, but the perfect campsite for your family will change your vacation experience.

This year at Camp Taylor, we had a wooded back-in site with a wonderful open field in front for the kids to run, kick a ball, or play tag.  The kids had fun and the adults relaxed. That is the very definition of a perfect site.

2. Be prepared, but be flexible.

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We do a whole lot of planning before we leave on any vacation. That first trip to Camp Taylor was scheduled from start to finish. So even though our boys were tired from that first cold, sleepless night we tried to stay on schedule and move through the itinerary. Big mistake.

This year we had a general list of possible activities, but were always willing to adjust depending on the family mood. On Saturday the sun came out even though rain had been forecast, so we jumped in the car and headed toward the Delaware Water Gap to hike Mt. Tammany. The next morning we were planning on fishing but saw an advertisement for an Animal Frolic at a nearby farm. This ended up being one of the highlights of our trip, and we still fit in fishing later that day.

It certainly helps to do your research, but don’t get to flustered if you hit a speed bump.  Just adjust the plan and keep having fun.

3. Find your own authentic experience.

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When we first starting RVing, we tried really hard to create that authentic camping experience. We were packing coolers, cooking over the campfire, and gathering kindling from the nearby woods. Many of these ‘camp chores’ can be really difficult and time consuming with little kids underfoot.

It took us a little while to realize we didn’t have to rough it if we didn’t want to. We learned to embrace all the amenities that our travel trailer offered. The air conditioning, heat, refrigerator, and microwave get tons of use on all of our trips. The crockpot supplies many of our camp dinners.

We travel in our RV to find that perfect mix of adventure and relaxation as a family. Whatever helps us raise the fun level and lower the stress level becomes a part of our own personal authentic experience.

What lessons have you learned from years of RVing? Do you do things differently now than you used to? We would love to hear your stories!

16 Jun

Celebrating Mom and Supporting KOA’s Care Camps

This article originally appeared in the Jayco Journal.

When you own an RV, planning your next family adventure is always part of the fun.  But should you go somewhere new or return to a place that you love? Our family has camped in eight different states, and we hope to travel to all fifty.  So whenever we hit the road with our White Hawk, we usually prefer exploring new destinations. However, there are certain campgrounds that call us back again and again.  The Philadelphia/West Chester KOA is one of those special places.  It is the home of our family’s favorite camping tradition.  Here’s why:

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1. It is a perfect place to spend Mother’s Day weekend. This KOA, which is owned and operated by Gary and Lori Levesque, is a wonderful setting for spending quality time together while celebrating Mom.  They have a shady playground, an open field for sports, a gem mining station, and a miniature golf course.  But most importantly, the idyllic Brandywine River meanders across the southwest side of the property.  This river is perfect for fishing with little kids or for taking mom on a long Mother’s Day canoe ride.  The banks of this historic river are filled with red-winged blackbirds and American golden finches, and the water is usually crystal clear and perfect for a brisk swim.  The Philadelphia/West Chester KOA is close enough for a weekend getaway–but once we dip our oars into the Brandywine we feel like we are a world away from home.

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2. We love supporting KOA’s Care Camps charity.  Mother’s Day weekend always coincides with KOA’s Care Camps weekend.  Four years ago we came for the free night of camping, but now we return to support this inspiring charity.  Each spring participating KOA campgrounds and their campers raise money to “send children with cancer to medically supervised camps where they have a great time in the great outdoors.”  Pretty easy to get behind that cause, right?  It was for us.  The Care Camps charity began in 1984 when donations for six camps totaled $7,100.  This year $800,000 was raised to support 52 different camps across the country.  The Levesques helped raise money by, among other things, selling Care Camps t-shirts and throwing an ice cream social with live music at their Liberty Lodge.  We did our part by polishing off some of that tasty ice cream and leaving with a bag full of new t-shirts.  This charitable aspect of our family tradition gives us an opportunity to teach our boys that they can help others and have fun doing it.

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3. Longwood Gardens is a hop, a skip, and a jump away.  You could spend the entire weekend right on the grounds of this delightful KOA, but then you would miss Longwood Gardens, which is a short drive away from the campground and makes for a perfect day trip. It is the former home of Pierre S. DuPont, and is truly one of our country’s great horticultural treasures. The highlight for us is always the magical Indoor Children’s Garden.  Our boys love to get wet in one of the many kid-friendly fountains and then run through the bamboo maze and bang on the xylophones at the music station.  Mom and Dad have wizened up over the years and now we make sure to bring towels and extra clothes for the kids.  When a camping destination becomes a family tradition you are given the opportunity to perfect your approach–and we definitely have more fun each year during Care Camps weekend.

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4. It’s a great place to bring family and friends.  We are big believers in sharing the joy of RVing with our friends and extended family, and we also believe in letting our favorite family traditions grow and change.  The Philadelphia/West Chester KOA is one of those super friendly campgrounds that has a very welcoming atmosphere.  So this year we brought Max and Theo’s godmother along and she contributed to the trip in spades.  When our twins found out that she was coming, they told her that she would have to be on best behavior while at the campground.  I’m happy to report that she was.  She made sausages for dinner, read the boys books before bedtime, and started up a baseball game right in front of our campsite.  She threw all strikes.  We definitely plan on saving her a bunk for next year’s trip.

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Are you hoping to start a new family camping tradition?  If so, find a campground that your family will love returning to for generations to come.  Why not try a KOA during Care Camps weekend?  Your family will help raise money for a worthy cause and you’ll get to celebrate Mom, everyone’s favorite camper.  Take her out for an invigorating hike and a canoe ride on a sparkling river.  Instead of buying her a bouquet, surround her with gardens of beautiful flowers.  She won’t miss brunch a bit.

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13 May

Big News, Folks: The Lively Little Campers Are Writing for the Jayco Journal!

The Lively Little Campers just spent another beautiful Mother’s Day weekend at the Philadelphia/West Chester KOA, where we enjoyed some annual family traditions and also discovered some new regional treasures.

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For those of you following us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, you got a sneak peak at the fun we had during our fourth stay in this beautiful area.

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Normally we would be telling you all about it in our blog posts this week. But this time, we have to keep some things under wraps.  Why, you may ask?

Well, let us tell you…

We are so excited to announce that we will be sharing our story of this past weekend on the Jayco Journal! For those of you not in the know, Jayco is the nation’s largest family-owned and operated manufacturer of RVs. They have just launched a new website, and we are thrilled to be contributing content to their blog.

We bought our White Hawk two years ago and have spent 75 nights camping in it. We absolutely love it, and we also love Jayco’s Brand Promise, Generations of Family Fun. You can check out this video on YouTube to learn more about it. If you want the whole story, the longer version is (of course) our personal favorite. After watching it, you will definitely want to get on the road and create new and exciting memories with your own family.

Our first article on the Jayco Journal will be posted toward the end of May. We will be sharing a bit more about how we became a Jayco family, along with articles on building family traditions and finding great family activities no matter where you are traveling. Follow the Journal throughout the month of June to read all of our articles.

And remember to subscribe to our eNewsletter. In addition to receiving a weekly email with great tips for family travel, you will also get the first announcement when our stories are up on the Jayco Journal.

And as always, thanks for joining us on this amazing adventure!